By Mortimer J. Adler, Robert M. Hutchins

Gateway to the nice Books is a 10-volume sequence of books initially released via Encyclopædia Britannica Inc. in 1963 and edited through Mortimer Adler and Robert Maynard Hutchins. The set was once designed as an advent to the nice Books of the Western international, released via an analogous association and editors in 1952. The set incorporated choices - brief tales, performs, essays, letters, and extracts from longer works - by means of a couple of hundred authors. the choices have been mostly shorter and in many ways easier than the full-length books incorporated within the nice Books.

Contents
Volume 1: creation; Syntopical Guide

* A letter to the reader
* Introduction
* Syntopical guide
* Appendices
o A plan of graded reading
o suggested novels
o prompt anthologies of poetry

Volume 2: innovative Literature I

* Daniel Defoe, Excerpts from Robinson Crusoe
* Rudyard Kipling, "Mowgli's Brothers" from The Jungle Book
* Victor Hugo, "The conflict with the Cannon" from Ninety-Three
* man de Maupassant, "Two Friends"
* Ernest Hemingway, "The Killers" from males with no Women
* Sir Walter Scott, "The Drovers" from Chronicles of the Canongate
* Joseph Conrad, "Youth"
* Voltaire, Micromegas
* Oscar Wilde, "The satisfied Prince" from The satisfied Prince and different Tales
* Edgar Allan Poe, "The Tell-Tale Heart", "The Masque of the crimson Death"
* Robert Louis Stevenson, The unusual Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde
* Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens), the fellow That Corrupted Hadleyburg
* Charles Dickens, "A complete and devoted record of the Memorable Trial of Bardell opposed to Pickwick" from The Pickwick Papers
* Nikolai Gogol, "The Overcoat"
* Samuel Butler, "Customs and reviews of the Erewhonians" from Erewhon
* Sherwood Anderson, "I'm a Fool"
* nameless, Aucassin and Nicolette

Volume three: resourceful Literature II

* Stephen Crane, "The Open Boat"
* Herman Melville, "Billy Budd"
* Ivan Bunin, "The Gentleman from San Francisco"
* Nathaniel Hawthorne, "Rappaccini's Daughter"
* George Eliot, "The Lifted Veil"
* Lucius Apuleius, "Cupid and Psyche" from The Golden Ass
* Ivan Turgenev, "First Love"
* Fyodor Dostoevsky, "White Nights"
* John Galsworthy, "The Apple-Tree"
* Gustave Flaubert, "The Legend of St. Julian the Hospitaller"
* F. Scott Fitzgerald, "The Diamond as significant because the Ritz"
* Honoré de Balzac, "A ardour within the Desert"
* Anton Chekhov, "The Darling"
* Isaac Singer, "The Spinoza of marketplace Street"
* Alexander Pushkin, "The Queen of Spades"
* D. H. Lawrence, "The Rocking-Horse Winner"
* Henry James, "The Pupil"
* Thomas Mann, "Mario and the Magician"
* Isak Dinesen, "Sorrow-Acre"
* Leo Tolstoy, "The loss of life of Ivan Ilyitch", "The 3 Hermits", "What males stay By"

Volume four: imaginitive Literature III

* Molière, The Misanthrope, The general practitioner even with Himself
* Richard Sheridan, the college for Scandal
* Henrik Ibsen, An Enemy of the People
* Anton Chekhov, The Cherry Orchard
* George Bernard Shaw, the fellow of Destiny
* John Synge, Riders to the Sea
* Eugene O'Neill, The Emperor Jones

Volume five: serious Essays

* Virginia Woolf, "How may still One learn a Book?"
* Matthew Arnold, "The examine of Poetry", "Sweetness and Light"
* Charles Augustin Sainte-Beuve, "What Is a Classic?", "Montaigne"
* Francis Bacon, "Of Beauty", "Of Discourse", "Of Studies"
* David Hume, "Of the normal of Taste"
* Arthur Schopenhauer, "On Style", "On a few types of Literature", "On the Comparative position of curiosity and sweetness in Works of Art"
* Friedrich Schiller, "On uncomplicated and mawkish Poetry"
* Percy Bysshe Shelley, "A Defence of Poetry"
* Walt Whitman, Preface to Leaves of Grass
* William Hazlitt, "My First Acquaintance with Poets", "On Swift", "Of folks One would want to Have Seen"
* Charles Lamb, "My First Play", "Dream little ones, a Reverie", "Sanity of actual Genius"
* Samuel Johnson, Preface to Shakespeare
* Thomas de Quincey, Literature of information and Literature of Power", "On the Knocking on the Gate in Macbeth"
* T. S. Eliot, "Dante", "Tradition and the person Talent"

Volume 6: guy and Society I

* John Stuart Mill, "Childhood and Youth" from Autobiography
* Mark Twain, "Learning the River" from lifestyles at the Mississippi
* Jean de los angeles Bruyere, "Characters" from A ebook of Characters
* Thomas Carlyle, 'The Hero as King" from On Heroes, Hero-Worship and the Heroic in History
* Ralph Waldo Emerson, "Thoreau"
* Nathaniel Hawthorne, "Sketch of Abraham Lincoln"
* Walt Whitman, "Death of Abraham Lincoln"
* Virginia Woolf, "The artwork of Biography"
* Xenophon, "The March to the Sea" from The Persian excursion, "The personality of Socrates" from Memorabilia
* William H. Prescott, "The Land of Montezuma" from The Conquest of Mexico
* Haniel lengthy, "The energy inside Us"
* Pliny the more youthful, "The Eruption of Vesuvius"
* Tacitus, "The lifetime of Gnaeus Julius Agricola"
* Francois Guizot, "Civilization" from historical past of Civilization in Europe
* Henry Adams, "The usa in 1800" from heritage of the U.S. of America
* John Bagnell Bury, "Herodotus" from the traditional Greek Historians
* Lucian, "The option to Write History"
* nice Documents
o The English invoice of Rights
o statement of the Rights of guy and of the Citizen
o The Virginia assertion of Rights
o The announcement of Independence
o constitution of the United Nations
o common announcement of Human Rights
* Thomas Paine, "A name to Patriots - December 23, 1776"
* George Washington, "Circular Letter to the Governors of the entire States on Disbanding the Army", "The Farewell Address"
* Thomas Jefferson, "The Virginia Constitution" from Notes on Virginia, "First Inaugural Address", "Biographical Sketches"
* Benjamin Franklin, "A inspiration for selling worthy wisdom one of the British Plantations in America", "Proposals in terms of the schooling of juvenile in Pennsylvania"
* Jean de Crevecoeur, "The Making of Americans" from Letters from an American Farmer
* Alexis de Tocqueville, "Observations on American existence and Government" from Democracy in America
* Henry David Thoreau,"Civil Disobedience", "A Plea for Captain John Brown"
* Abraham Lincoln, "Address at Cooper Institute", "First Inaugural Address", "Letter to Horace Greeley", "Meditation at the Divine Will", "The Gettysburg Address", "Second Inaugural Address", "Last Public Address"

Volume 7: guy and Society II

* Francis Bacon, "Of early life and Age", "Of mom and dad and Children", "Of Marriage and unmarried Life", "Of nice Place", "Of Seditions and Troubles", "Of customized and Education", "Of fans and Friends", "Of Usury", "Of Riches"
* Jonathan quick, "Resolutions while I end up Old", "An Essay on sleek Education", "A Meditation upon a Broomstick", "A Modest thought for combating the youngsters of eire from Being a Burden to Their mom and dad or Country"
* David Hume, "Of Refinement within the Arts", "Of Money", "Of the stability of Trade", "Of Taxes", "Of the learn of History"
* Plutarch, "Of Bashfulness"
* Robert Louis Stevenson, "The Lantern-Bearers" from around the Plains
* John Ruskin, "An Idealist's Arraignment of the Age" from 4 Clavigera
* William James, "On a undeniable Blindness in Human Beings", "The Energies of Men", "Great males and Their Environment"
* Arthur Schopenhauer, "On Education"
* Michael Faraday, "Observations on psychological Education"
* Edmund Burke, "Letter to the Sheriffs of Bristol"
* John Calhoun, "The Concurrent Majority"
* Thomas Babington Macaulay, "Machiavelli"
* Voltaire, "English males and Ideas" from Letters at the English
* Dante, "On global Government" from De Monarchia
* Jean Jacques Rousseau, "A Lasting Peace throughout the Federation of Europe"
* Immanuel Kant, "Perpetual Peace"
* Karl von Clausewitz, "What Is War?" from On War
* Thomas Robert Malthus, "The precept of Population" from inhabitants: the 1st Essay

Volume eight: ordinary Science

* Francis Bacon, "The Sphinx"
* John Tyndall, "Michael Faraday" from Faraday as a Discoverer
* Eve Curie, "The Discovery of Radium" from Madame Curie
* Charles Darwin, "Autobiography"
* Jean Henri Fabre, "A Laboratory of the Open Fields", "The Sacred Beetle"
* Loren Eiseley, "On Time"
* Rachel Carson, "The Sunless Sea" from the ocean round Us
* J. B. S. Haldane, "On Being definitely the right Size" from attainable Worlds
* Thomas Henry Huxley, "On the relatives of guy to the decrease Animals", "On a bit of Chalk"
* Francis Galton, "The type of Human Ability" from Hereditary Genius
* Claude Bernard, "Experimental concerns universal to residing issues and Inorganic Bodies"
* Ivan Pavlov, "Scientific examine of the So-called Psychical approaches within the larger Animals"
* Friedrich Wohler, "On the substitute creation of Urea"
* Charles Lyell, "Geological Evolution" from the rules of Geology
* Galileo, "The Starry Messenger"
* Tommaso Campanella, "Arguments for and opposed to Galileo" from The security of Galileo
* Michael Faraday, The Chemical heritage of a Candle
* Dmitri Mendeleev, "The Genesis of a legislation of Nature" from The Periodic legislation of the Chemical Elements
* Hermann von Helmholtz, "On the Conservation of Force"
* Albert Einstein and Leopold Infeld, "The upward push and Decline of Classical Physics" from The Evolution of Physics
* Arthur Eddington, "The Running-Down of the Universe" from Nature and the actual World
* James denims, "Beginnings and Endings" from The Universe round Us
* Kees Boeke, "Cosmic View"

Volume nine: Mathematics

* Lancelot Hogben, "Mathematics, the replicate of Civilization" from arithmetic for the Million
* Andrew Russell Forsyth, "Mathematics, in existence and Thought"
* Alfred North Whitehead, "On Mathematical Method", "On the character of a Calculus"
* Bertrand Russell, "The research of Mathematics", "Mathematics and the Metaphysicians", "Definition of Number"
* Edward Kasner and James R. Newman, "New Names for Old", "Beyond the Googol"
* Tobias Dantzig, "Fingerprints", "The Empty Column"
* Leonhard Euler, "The Seven Bridges of Konigsberg"
* Norman Robert Campbell, "Measurement", "Numerical legislation and using arithmetic in Science"
* William Clifford, "The Postulates of the technology of Space" from the commonsense of the precise Sciences
* Henri Poincaré, "Space", "Mathematical Creation", "Chance"
* Pierre Simon de Laplace, "Probability" from A Philosophical Essay on Probabilities
* Charles Sanders Peirce, "The pink and the Black"

Volume 10: Philosophical Essays

* John Erskine, "The ethical legal responsibility to Be Intelligent"
* William Clifford, "The Ethics of Belief"
* William James, "The Will to Believe", "The Sentiment of Rationality"
* John Dewey, "The technique of Thought" from How We Think
* Epicurus, "Letter to Herodotus", "Letter to Menoeceus"
* Epictetus, The Enchiridion
* Walter Pater, "The paintings of Life" from The Renaissance
* Plutarch, "Contentment"
* Cicero, "On Friendship", "On previous Age"
* Francis Bacon, "Of Truth", "Of Death", "Of Adversity", "Of Love", "Of Friendship", "Of Anger"
* George Santayana, "Lucretius", "Goethe's Faust"
* Henry Adams, "St. Thomas Aquinas" from Mont-Saint-Michel and Chartres
* Voltaire, "The Philosophy of universal Sense"
* John Stuart Mill, "Nature"
* Ralph Waldo Emerson, "Nature", "Self-Reliance", "Montaigne; or, the Skeptic"
* William Hazlitt, "On the sensation of Immortality in Youth"
* Thomas Browne, "Immortality" from Urn-Burial

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Extra resources for A Gateway to the Great Books, Volumes 1-10

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5) says of this “children’s” writer that “the ludicrous in Swift arises out of his keen sense of impropriety, his soreness and impatience of the least absurdity. He separates, with a severe and caustic air, truth from falsehood. . His better genius was his spleen. ” Which is the more effective, gentle or sharp satire? In the latter category we find Shaw’s The Man of Destiny (Vol. 4), which, like Aristophanes’ renowned Lysistrata (GBWW, Vol. 4), is a theater piece mirthfully satirizing the most terrible of all human activities, war.

Great Men and Their Environment, Vol. 7). ’ . . ” This, says Carlyle in The Hero as King (Vol. 6), was the fate of Cromwell; he was too great for his time. “One man, in the course of fifteen hundred years; and this was his welcome. He had adherents by the hundred or the ten; opponents by the million. Had England rallied all round him—why, then, England might have been a Christian land! ” Thoreau’s A Plea for Captain John Brown (Vol. 6) compares the fanatical hero of the Abolition movement with Cromwell, his little band of men with Cromwell’s troops, and his speeches with Cromwell’s, closing his plea by quoting from Brown himself: “‘I think, my friends, you are guilty of a great wrong against God and humanity, and it would be perfectly right for anyone to interfere with you so far as to free those you willfully and wickedly hold.

As belles-lettres it is rarely successful, but in Henrik Ibsen it reaches its artistic peak. In An Enemy of the People (Vol. 4) we see the protagonist on his feet fighting social evil. He is beaten but he is never stupid, as he is in satire, or ridiculous, as he is in comedy. ” (See On Liberty, in GBWW, Vol. ) “The strongest man in the world,” says the heroic (some would say bullheaded) Dr. Stockmann in Ibsen’s classic, “is he who stands most alone,” echoing Walt Whitman’s words in his Preface to Leaves of Grass (Vol.

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A Gateway to the Great Books, Volumes 1-10 by Mortimer J. Adler, Robert M. Hutchins


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